Vergnügte Ruh beliebte Seelenlust, GWV 1147/11 (Graupner, Christoph)

Contents

Sheet Music

Scores and Parts

PDF scanned by D-DS
Boccaccio (2010/6/10)

Publisher. Info. Autograph manuscript, July 1711
Copyright
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PMLP135810-Mus-Ms-419-12.pdf

PDF typeset by Richard Kram
Richard Kram (2012/8/12)

PDF typeset by Richard Kram
Richard Kram (2012/8/12)

PDF typeset by Richard Kram
Richard Kram (2012/8/12)

Editor Richard Kram
Publisher. Info. Richard Kram
Copyright
Misc. Notes New versions now posted correcting numerous text errors.
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PMLP135810-Graupner Vergnugte Ruh Urtext Merged.pdf

Vocal Scores

PDF typeset by Richard Kram
Richard Kram (2012/8/12)

Arranger Richard Kram, keyboard reduction
Publisher. Info. Richard Kram
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General Information

Work Title Vergnügte Ruh beliebte Seelenlust, GWV 1147/11
Alternative. Title
Composer Graupner, Christoph
Opus/Catalogue NumberOp./Cat. No. GWV 1147/11
Key F major
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. 1711
First Performance. 1711
Librettist Georg Christian Lehms (1684–1717)
Language German
Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Baroque
Piece Style Baroque
Instrumentation Soprano, 2 flutes, violetta, strings, basso continuo

Misc. Comments

About the Kram Editions

Three versions are posted. The first is true to the original (though the violetta line is transcribed into treble clef). Movements 1 and 5 use two viols notated in alto and tenor clefs, though the parts (which might have been written later) say viola. The second complete orchestral version places the two viols as violas and notates them both in alto clef. A piano reduction is also included to assist in easily creating your own continuo part (though some continuo is added where only continuo was present). The final version is a piano vocal score on the Arrangements and Transcriptions tab. The continuo part at the end of the original scan contains figures which obviously were written in at a later date. For the most part they seem reasonable so I kept them. Very interesting comparing this with Bach's Cantata on the same text (BWV170, written in 1726).