A Prayer for Contralto, Viola and Piano (Sydeman, William Jay)

Contents

Performances

Recordings

No files submitted.

Synthesized/MIDI

MP3 file (audio)
Rickshinozaki (2017/9/27)

Performers Realization by the composer
Publisher Info. William Jay Sydeman
Copyright
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.

Sheet Music

Parts

PDF typeset by composer
Rickshinozaki (2017/9/27)

PDF typeset by composer
Rickshinozaki (2017/9/27)

PDF typeset by composer
Rickshinozaki (2017/9/27)

PDF typeset by composer
Rickshinozaki (2017/9/27)

Publisher. Info. Arts Aeturnum Productions, 2014
Copyright
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.

Javascript is required to submit files.

General Information

Work Title A Prayer for Contralto, Viola and Piano
Alternative. Title
Composer Sydeman, William Jay
I-Catalogue NumberI-Cat. No. IWS 26
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 1 piece
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. 1983 ca.
Librettist Composer
Language English
Average DurationAvg. Duration 4 minutes
Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Modern
Piece Style Modern
Instrumentation contralto (or oboe or violin), viola, piano

Misc. Comments

A Prayer for contralto, viola and piano was written in the early eighties while I was teaching at the Rudolf Steiner College in Fair Oaks, CA. I wrote the text, which is quietly inward looking and meditative, reflective of the life of spirit which is at the foundation of all of Steiner’s teaching. Nevertheless there is a middle section in which the viola becomes quite ecstatic before returning to its original quieter state. For the most part voice and viola are in contrapuntal relationship to each other, with the piano creating romantic flowing textures around both. Although the text clearly outlines these states of being, it is obviously intrinsic to the instrumental version as well.

A word about the text: Although it speaks a creator God and Christ being, this is not intended to refer to our traditional organized religions, but rather to that which dwells within us as a spark of that creativity.

– W. Jay Sydeman