Concerto a quattro in D minor (Handel, George Frideric)

Authorship Note
This work is also attributed to Telemann. Not in HWV


Contents

Sheet Music

Score and Parts

PDF scanned by Jurabe
Jurabe (2014/12/3)

PDF scanned by Jurabe
Jurabe (2014/12/3)

PDF scanned by Jurabe
Jurabe (2014/12/3)

PDF scanned by Jurabe
Jurabe (2014/12/3)

PDF scanned by Jurabe
Jurabe (2014/12/3)

PDF scanned by Jurabe
Jurabe (2014/12/3)

Editor Fritz Zobeley (d.1969)
First edition
Publisher. Info. Antiqua, einer Sammlung alter Musik, ANT 51
Mainz: B. Schott's Söhne, No.2317, 1935. Plate B.S.S. 33910.
Copyright
Misc. Notes From the uploader's library. No information was found on the editor except his date of demise on a German page. Trilingual Preface removed.
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General Information

Work Title Concerto a quattro in D minor
Alternative. Title
Composer Handel, George Frideric
Key D minor
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 4 movements
1. Adagio
2. Allegro
3. Largo
4. Allegro
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. 1715 ca.
Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Baroque
Piece Style Baroque
Instrumentation flute (violin), violin, cello obligato, continuo

Misc. Comments

According to the editor, the manuscripts of the 2 Sonatas were found in the music library of Count Schönborn in Wiesentheid-Unterfranken (Bavaria), a discovery he described in detail in an article published in the Händel Jahrbuch 1931 (Werke Händels in der Gräflich von Schönbornschen Musikbibliothek). He firmly ascribes the manuscripts to Handel although they are not in the composer's own handwriting, on the basis of their title : "2 Concertos par le sieur Händel" but also historical and stylistic evidence. Count Rudolf Franz Erwin von, Schönhorn was a passionate violoncellist which may explain the nature of the leading cello part. The editor assumes he made Handel's personal acquaintance through Handel's great friend and patron, Agostino Steffani. He considers there is a striking resemblance in style with Handel's works written during his journey to Ansbach in 1715 when he could have visited Count Schönborn to present him with the two concertos.