Ink haste (Psimikakis-Chalkokondylis, Nikolaos-Laonikos)

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Sheet Music

Instructions

 Performance Instructions and Programme Note
#60686 - 0.03MB, 2 pp. -  10.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (1) - !N/!N/!N - 456x

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Jujimufu (2010/4/3)

 Timings for the performers
#60690 - 0.01MB, 3 pp. -  10.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (1) - !N/!N/!N - 298x

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Jujimufu (2010/4/3)

TN-Ink Haste.jpg
Publisher Info.:

London: 2009

Copyright:

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 [tag/del]

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Parts

 Crotales
#60687 - 3.62MB, 9 pp. -  0.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (0) - !N/!N/!N - 183x

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 Piano
#60688 - 2.77MB, 9 pp. -  0.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (0) - !N/!N/!N - 184x

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Jujimufu (2010/4/3)

 Xiao flute
#60689 - 2.73MB, 9 pp. -  0.0/10 2 4 6 8 10 (0) - !N/!N/!N - 338x

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Jujimufu (2010/4/3)

PMLP124280-Laonikos - ink haste (crotales).pdf
Publisher Info.:

London: 2009

Copyright:

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 [tag/del]

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Free Recordings

  • YouTube Video. The video projection was part of the performance of the piece, which was recorded by Imogen Baylis (piano), Caz Wolfson (crotales) and the composer (xiao flute).
  • Audio recordings (longer and shorter takes)

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General Information

Work Title ink haste
Alternative Title
Composer Psimikakis-Chalkokondylis, Nikolaos-Laonikos
Year/Date of Composition 2009
First Performance 2 March 2009 by Imogen Baylis, Marco Atzei and the composer
First Publication 2009
Average Duration 8'
Piece Style Modern
Instrumentation Crotales, Xiao flute and Piano


Misc. Comments

The piece was written in response to a collaboration between the Materials Library (London, UK) and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. The performance took place in Guildhall's Music Hall on the 2nd of March 2009, as part of the Conservatoire Conference taking place over three days.


From the programme note:

Ink haste was written in response to our involvement with the Materials' Library at King's College, London this year.

The material I chose to present to the Material's Library group was a CPU cooler from a computer I found in the street, made entirely out of aluminium. It cools down the processor by having a small contact area with the CPU and absorbing the CPU's heat and transferring it to the rest of its surface (which is increased by having a lot of flaps and ridges), which in turn is transferred to the air which comes into contact with the surface of the cooler.

I was fascinated by this object because of its very simple concept and design (although it's very difficult to make), because it consists entirely of a single material throughout with no extra mechanisms,and because the function it performs is inherent to its properties (i.e. the property of aluminium of being a very good heat conductor).

The instruments I chose are all made of a single material: bamboo (xiao flute) and steel (crotales and the strings of the piano - the piano player does not interact with the piano in any other way other than directly with the strings), resulting in three different means of producing sound: vibration of a string, of a body and of the air. There is no full score for ink haste - the music consists entirely of parts. Each performer has seven pages which they have to perform within a given time frame. The first page is very graphic and open to interpretation, with no music-related symbols; the last page is traditionally notated, with almost no freedom of interpretation. The rest of the pages are in-between open and closed scores, moving from one end to the other. This is a reference to the "cooling down" function that my material has: the piece moves from very spontaneous, adventurous and unpredictable (for both the players and the audience) to more limited, calm and predictable.

The title refers to the visual image of the first pages of the parts, which are the result of spilled ink or random gestures on blank pages trying to get my pens to work, and also to the fact that this piece was written intensely over a short period of time as the deadline was approaching. Last, but not least, "ink haste" is an anagram of "heat sink", which is the official term used to describe this object, thus bearing a reference to the material itself.

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