Severn Suite, Op.87 (Elgar, Edward)

Since this work was first published after 1922 with the prescribed copyright notice, it is unlikely that this work is public domain in the USA. However, it is in the public domain in Canada (where IMSLP is hosted), the EU, and in those countries where the copyright term is life+70 years or less.

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Sheet Music

Arrangements and Transcriptions

Selections: "Organ Sonata No.2"

For Organ (Atkins)

PDF scanned by jurabe
Jurabe (2013/6/9)

Arranger Ivor Atkins (1869-1953)
Publisher. Info. London: Keith Prowse, 1933. Plate K.P.& Co. 4677
Copyright
Misc. Notes From the uploader's library.
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General Information

Work Title Severn Suite
Alternative. Title
Composer Elgar, Edward
Opus/Catalogue NumberOp./Cat. No. Op.87
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 5 movements
  1. Introduction. Pomposo (Worcester Castle)
  2. Toccata. Allegro molto (Tournament)
  3. Fugue. Andante (The Cathedral)
  4. Minuet. Moderato (Commandery)
  5. Coda. Lento - Pomposo
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. 1930
First Performance. 1930 September 27 (brass band version)
1932 April 14 (full orchestra version)
First Publication. 1931 in re-arrangement (see below.)
Dedication George Bernard Shaw
Average DurationAvg. Duration 16–20 minutes
Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Early 20th century
Piece Style Early 20th century
Instrumentation Brass Band, Orchestra
External Links Elgar.org
Wikipedia article


Misc. Comments

The minuet comes from a 1879 work, so one could say 1879–1930.

Also from Elgar.org: "As Elgar had no particular experience of writing for brass bands, the organisers suggested that Elgar produce a short score for Henry Geehl to arrange. The collaboration proved unsatisfactory, Geehl rejecting most of Elgar's ideas for the arrangement in favour of his own. More recently, a fully scored arrangement for brass band, apparently in Elgar's own hand, surfaced at auction in 1995 (when the score failed to reach its reserve price) and again in 1996." - so, the brass band version that was published by R. Smith of London in 1931 was quite probably Geehl's arrangement (or even, re-writing?) of Elgar's short score, not Elgar's work.