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HISTORICAL NOTES for SOLOS FOR TREBLE INSTRUMENT,
ESPECIALLY SOPRANO RECORDER

COLLECTION 12: WESTERN EUROPEAN MELODIES

Arranged/Composed by Clark Kimberling
Arrangement titles begin with the letters A-Y.
Composition titles begin with the letter Z.



The 200 solos in Collection 12 can be accessed by clicking SOLOS 12 -- but first, read this: the solos occupy 207 pages and may take a minute to download, and your computer must have Acrobat or some other PDF reader. After viewing the solos, you may wish to print them and put them in a big notebook. However, before clicking SOLOS 12, you really should browse these Historical Notes. Here you will find many links to in-depth information.

Collection 12 consists of three types of solos: anonymous; those based on melodies by historic composers, and solos composed specifically for Collection 12.


Contents

BRIEF SURVEY OF CONTENTS


Anonymous melodies include folk songs, dance melodies, and plainsong chants, representing several Western European countries:

Austria (6)
Belgium (1)
Czech Republic (1)
France (6)
Germany (2)
Greece (1)
Holland (1)
Italy (5)
Sicily (2)
Sweden (1)
Spain (10)
European, generally (3)

Among composers represented are the follows:

Bach (3)
Barsanti (1)
Beethoven (2)
Chelleri (1)
Corelli (3)
De Curtis (1)
Denza (1)
Donizetti (1)
Hermann (1)
Jacquet (2)
Loeillet, J. B. (6)
Lully (1)
Marcello (1)
Mattheson (1)
Neumark (1)
Paradisi (1)
Rameau (1)
Richard the Lion-Hearted (1)
Scalatti, A. (2)
Scalatti, D. (3)
Schubert (7)
Schumann (4)
Strauss, J. (3)
Susato (2)
Sweelinck (2)
Telemann (6)
Vivaldi (7)
Vulpius (1)
Weber (1)
Winding (1)


HISTORIES OF MELODIES


A LA MAR FUI POR NARANJAS, a folk song collected in the principality of Asturias, Spain, published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancionero de Asturias, Antonio Carmona, Madrid, Editorial Musica Moderna, Madrid, 1973. Visit Asturias, Spain.

ÄCHT LÄNDLER NOS. 5 AND 6, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from Ächt Ländler (Eight Ländler Dances), in Tänze für Pianoforte. See Ländler. Visit the composer and Naxos.

AL PASAR LA BARCA, a Spanish folk song, published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancionero popular infantile español, 6th ed., Editorial Musica Moderna, Madrid, 1990.

ALLA BREVE, composed by Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741), first published in Paris in 1737 as part of a collection of six sonatas for any one of several possible instruments, including violin, oboe, and recorder. The present arrangement is based on the second of four movements of the Sonata in G minor. Visit the composer and a list of his compositions.

ALLEGRETTO, composed by Giuseppe Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757). Visit the composer and Baroque Composers and Musicians.

ALLEGRO, composed by Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767), possibly the most prolific of all composers. Visit the composer.

ALLEGRO MA NON PRESTO, composed by Antonio Vivaldi. The present arrangement is based on the fourth and final movement of the Sonata in G minor. See Alla Breve.

ALLEGRO NON TROPPO, composed by Domenico Scarlatti. This arrangement is based on a movement of Scarlatti’s well known “Pastorale” sonata for harpsichord. See Allegretto.

ALLEGRO (PARTITA IN G), composed by Georg Philipp Telemann. This is the second aria of Partita 2 in Telemann’s Die Kleine Kammermusik: Sechs Partiten für Violine (Querflöte, Oboe, Blockflöte) und Basso Continuo. See Allegro.

ALLEGRO (HARPSICHORD), composed by Pietro Domenico Paradisi (1707-1791). This is an arrangement of one of the best known of the composer’s pieces, the Allegro con fuoco from his Sonata in A Major. Visit the composer.

ALLEGRO (SONATA IN A MINOR), by Jean Baptiste Loeillet (of Ghent, Belgium, 1688 - c.1720). Visit the composer.

ALLEGRO (SONATA IN B-FLAT), composed by Francesco Barsanti (1690–1750?). Barsanti played flute and oboe at the Italian Opera in London, where, in 1727, he published several sonatas for recorder. Visit the composer.

ALLEGRO (SONATA IN F), composed by Benedetto Marcello (1686-1739). The Sonata in F was published in Amsterdam in 1715. Visit the composer.

ALLEMANDA, composed by Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713). This is the second movement of his Sonata VIII. Visit the composer.

ALLEMANDE, composed by François Couperin (1668-1723), published in his L’Art de toucher le Clavecin, 1716. Visit the composer.

ALOUETTE, a French-Canadian folk sing. Marius Barbeau has stated that the song originated in France, but no publication of it from France is known to have preceded its appearance in A Pocket Song Book for the Use of the Students and Graduates of McGill College, Montreal, 1879. The name “Alouette” means “skylark” in French. For lyrics, visit Alouette.

ARROYO CLARO, a Spanish folk song, published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancieonero popular infantile español, 6th ed., Editorial Musica Moderna, Madrid, 1990.

AUF DER ALMA, a Tyrolean folk song. Tyrol is a state in Austria. The melody includes many “yodeling intevals”: sixths and sevenths.

BRANLE HOBOKEN, a tune published in Sebastian Vreedman’s Liber Secondus, Louvain, 1569 and many times thereafter. A Branle is a 16th-century French dance. For a description, visit Branle.

THE CARNIVAL OF VENICE, a folk melody which has been arranged many times as a virtuoso piece for various instruments, including trumpet, cornet, violin, or flute. The name (Carnevale di Venezia in Italian) applies to an annual festival dating from 13th century Venice. Visit the Carnival and the song.

COLISEUM WALTZ, composed by Johann Strauss II (1825-1899), known as the Waltz King. Published, for example, in Beauties of Strauss, Lee & Walker, Philadelphia, 1872. Visit the composer.

COME BACK TO SORRENTO, composed by Ernesto de Curtis (1875-1937), published in Echoes of Naples – Thirty Neapolitan Songs, Oliver Ditson Co., Boston, 1909. Visit the city of Sorrento, Italy.

COME WITH ME, an Italian folk song, published in Die F. A. K. Volksangbundel, Firma J. H. De Bussy, Pretoria, 1937.

CORRENTE, composed by Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713). This is the second movement of his Sonata VII. See Allemanda.

COURANTE, composed by Jean-Baptiste Lully (1633-1687), adapted from Early Keyboard Music, G. Schirmer, New York, 1905.

CUERPO BUENO, a Spanish bulerías, published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancionero de Andalucia, 2nd ed., Madrid, 1971. For further information, visit Bulerias.

CUATRO PAÑOLINAS, a Spanish folk song marked “Baile de los Pollos” (chicken dance), published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancionero de Asturias, Antonio Carmona, Madrid, Editorial Musica Moderna, Madrid, 1973. Visit Asturias, Spain.

DANSE SAUVAGE D’ASTA, composed by August Winding (1835-1899), from his ballet The Mountain Hut. Winding is one of fifteen Danish composers whose ballet scores were cultivated by August Bournonville. Arrangements of selected ballet scores, including Danse Sauvage d’Asta, appear in Knud Arne Jürgensen’s The Bournonville Heritage: a choreographic record, 1829-1875, Dance Books, Cecil Court, London, 1991. Visit the composer and August Bournonville.

DE ROMMELPOT, a folk song from Flemish-speaking Belgium. The melody was sung during the Christmas and New Year’s season as a beggar’s song or wassail. The rommelpot – literally a pig’s bladder – was a type of friction drum used to accompany the singing. Published in Michael Raven’s compilation, Folk Songs of the Low Countries…with arrangements for solo guitar, West Central Printing Co., London, 1977. Visit the rommelpot and related percussion instruments.

DE GUESCLIN, a 15th-century French folk song, published in Julien Tiersot’s compilation, Chants Populaires pour les Écoles, Librairie Hachette, Paris, 1895 (and many editions thereafter). Bertrand de Guesclin was Constable of France, 1370-1380. Visit Guesclin.

ECOSSAISEN NOS. 5 AND 6, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from his Tänze für Pianoforte. An ecossaise was a kind of dance popular in Austria and Germany during the early 19th century. The word écossaise is French for Scottish. However, the dance and its music do not have any definite Scottish precedents.

EIN FEINES TÄNTZLEIN, one of about 108 dance melodies preserved in manuscript form in the Museum Carolinum in Linz, Austria, in a collection entitled Linzer Orgeltabulatur: für Orgel, 1611/1613.

EL MARINERO EN EL MAR, a folk song collected in the principality of Asturias, Spain, published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancionero de Asturias, Antonio Carmona, Madrid, Editorial Musica Moderna, Madrid, 1973. Visit Asturias, Spain.

ERSCHIENEN IST DER HERLICH TAG, composed by Nikolaus Hermann (c1480-1561), published in his Sonntagsevangelia über das ganze Jahr, Wittenberg, 1560. The melody occurs in modern hymnals with words by Hermann himself. Translated, they begin thus: "On earth has dawned this day of days, whereon the faithful give God praise!" Visit the composer.

ERSTER VERLUST, composed by Robert Schumann (1810-1856). This piece, with title meaning “First Sorrow,” is included in Schumann’s Album für die Jugend (Album for the Young), Opus 68, published in 1848. Visit the composer.

FUNICULI, FUNICULA, composed by Luigi Denza (1846-1922) to commemorate the opening of the world’s first funicular railway, at Mt. Vesuvius. Visit the composer and details about the song and some plagiarism. Visit Vesuvius.

FÜR ELISE, composed by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), a favorite children's piece for piano. If Beethoven had in mind a specific Elise, her identity remains a mystery. According to Fuld, the piece was composed on April 27, 1810 and was first published 57 years later, in Neue Briefe Beethovens..., Stuttgart. Visit the composer and notes about the music.

GAUDEAMUS PARITER, possibly first published in Johann Horn's Ein Gesangbuch der Brüder im Behemen und Merherrn, Nuremburg, 1544. This melody is included in many modern hymnals, with the Easter text beginning thus: "Come, ye faithful, raise the strain."

GAVOTTA, by Jean Baptiste Loeillet (of Ghent, Belgium, 1688-ca.1720). This Gavotta is from Loeillet’s Sonata in E minor, Opus 5, no. 1, the fourth movement. Opus 5, published in 1717, was Loeillet’s last known work. Visit the composer.

GAVOTTE IN G, composed by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). Visit the composer and the J. S. Bach Home Page.

GELOBT SEI GOTT, composed by Melchior Vulpius ( ), published in his End schon geistlich Gesangbuch, Jena, 1609. This well known hymn tune is often sung to the Easter text beginning thus: "Good Christians all, rejoice and sing! Now is the triumph of our King!" Visit the composer.

GIGA (MANCHESTER), composed by Antonio Vivaldi. This arrangement is based on the Giga (Jig) from the Manchester Violin Sonata no. 10. The twelve Manchester sonatas are named for their place of preservation: the Henry Watson Music Library, Manchester, England (call number MS 624.1 Vw 81.) See Alla Breve.

GIGA (SONATA IN D MINOR), composed by Jean Baptiste Loeillet (of Ghent, Belgium, 1688-ca.1720). See Gavotta.

GIGA (SONATA IN E MINOR), by Jean Baptiste Loeillet (of Ghent, Belgium, 1688-ca.1720). See Gavotta.

GIGA (SONATA IN G MINOR), composed by Fortunato Chelleri (1690-1757), published in his Sonate di galanteria per il cembalo. Visit the composer.

GIGUE, an anonymous melody in the collections of Prince-Bishop Carl Liechtenstein-Castelcorn (1624-1695), preserved in manor at Kroměříž in the Czech Republic. Visit the manor.

GIGUE I, composed by Johann Mattheson (1681-1764). Visit the composer.

THE HORSEMAN, composed by Robert Schumann. The German title, Reiterstück, has often been rendered as “The Wild Horseman.” It is included Schumann’s Album für die Jugend (Album for the Young), Opus 68, published in 1848. See Erster Verlust.

HYMN TO JOY, composed by Ludwig van Beethoven, used with J. C. F. von Schiller's text, Ode to Joy in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, completed in 1824.

JÁ NUNS HONS PRIS, traditionally attributed to Richard the Lion-Hearted (1157-1199), published in Harold Gleason’s compilation, Examples of Music Before 1400, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York, 1942.

JEANNE D’ARC, a 15th-century French folk song, published in Julien Tiersot’s compilation, Chants Populaires pour les Écoles, Librairie Hachette, Paris, 1895 (and many editions thereafter). Joan of Arc was a national heroine of France, born about 1412 and executed on May 30, 1431 for heresy. However, in 1456, Pope Callixtus III declared her innocent, and on May 16, 1920, she was canonized by Pope Benedict XV in St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome. As a saint, her feast day is May 30. Visit Joan of Arc and Jeanne d' Arc.

JIBI-DI, JIBI-DA, a folk song said to be from Bretagne, France, published with dance steps in Elizabeth Burchenal’s compilation, Folk-Dances from Old Homelands,, G. Schirmer, New York, 1922.

LA CATANESE, a Sicilian folk song, collected by Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791-1864), published in Fritz Bose’s compilation, Sizilianische Volkslieder, W. de Gruyter, Berlin, 1970. Visit Sicily.

LA DIANE, composed by François Couperin (1668-1723). See Allemande.

LA LOLA TIENE UN CHIQUILLO, a folk song collected in the principality of Asturias, Spain, published in Juan Hidalgo Montoya’s compilation, Cancionero de Asturias, Antonio Carmona, Madrid, Editorial Musica Moderna, Madrid, 1973. Visit Asturias, Spain.

LA LUISELLA, published in Echoes of Naples – Thirty Neapolitan Songs, Oliver Ditson Co., Boston, 1909. See Te Voglio Bene Assaje.

LA MANON, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LA MILORDINE, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LA MORINÉTE, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LA MUSE VICTORIEUSE, composed by François Couperin. Visit The Victorius Muse. See Allemande.

LA NANETTE, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LA PETIT-RIEN, composed by François Couperin (1668-1723) for harpsichord. The title means “The Trifle.” See Allemande.

LA TRAPANISI, a Sicilian folk song, collected by Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791-1864), published in Fritz Bose’s compilation, Sizilianische Volkslieder, W. de Gruyter, Berlin, 1970.

LÄNDLER, published in Corpus Musicae Popularis Austriacae, vol. 1, Niederösterreich: St. Pölten und Umbegung, Vienna. Collected during the 1920’s in the region of Pottenbrunn. Prior to the 19th-century spread of the waltz, polka, and mazurka, the ländler was the most common folkdance in Austria. Like the waltz, the dance and its music are in 3/4 time.

LÄNDLER NOS. 1 AND 2, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from his Tänze für Pianoforte. See Ländler.

LARGO, composed by Antonio Vivaldi. The present arrangement is based on the third movement of the Sonata in G Minor. See Alla Breve.

LARGO (MANCHESTER), composed by Antonio Vivaldi. This arrangement is based on the Largo from the Manchester Violin Sonata no. 10. The twelve Manchester sonatas are named for their place of preservation: the Henry Watson Music Library, Manchester, England (call number MS 624.1 Vw 81.) See Alla Breve and Giga (Manchester).

LE TAMBOURIN, composed by Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764). Visit the composer.

LES GRACES-NATURÉLES, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LES MOISSONNEAURS, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LES PAPILLONS, composed by François Couperin. See Allemande.

LES PETITS MOULINS À VENT, composed by François Couperin (1668-1723). See Allemande.

MARCH, composed by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). Visit the composer and the J. S. Bach Home Page.

MEIN JUNGES LEBEN HAT EIN END’, a secular song known to Dutch composer Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562-1621), who composed variations on it as found, for example, in his Works for Organ and Keyboard, Dover Publications, New York, 1985.

MELODIE, composed by Robert Schumann, included in his Album für die Jugend (Album for the Young), Opus 68, published in 1848. See Erster Verlust.

MENUET, composed by Fortunato Chelleri (1690-1757), published in his Sonate di galanteria per il cembalo. This is the fourth and final movement of Sonata No. 4 in D Major. Visit the composer.

MINUETTO, composed by Alessandro Scarlatti (1660-1725). Visit the composer.

MINUETTO IN D MINOR, composed by Domenico Scarlatti. See Allegretto.

MY NOOINTJIE WOON IN HEIDELBERG, an Austrian folk song, published in Die F. A. K. Volksangbundel, Firma J. H. De Bussy, Pretoria, 1937.

NEUER TANZ, one of about 108 dance melodies preserved in manuscript form in the Museum Carolinum in Linz, Austria, in a collection entitled Linzer Orgeltabulatur: für Orgel, 1611/1613.

NO ONE WILL DIE, adapted from a Greek folk song from the Cyclades Islands, published in Ellen Frye’s compilation, The Marble Threshing Floor, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1973. The name is taken from the last line stanza, pertaining to World War II, translated thus: "The Americans have come, and no one is going to die."

‘O SOLE MIO! composed by Eduardo di Capua (1865-1917), published in Echoes of Naples – Thirty Neapolitan Songs, Oliver Ditson Co., Boston, 1909. The name means “My Sun” (not “O, My Sun”). Visit the composer and the song. Visit Neapolitan song.

PANGE LINGUA, a Sarum plainsong melody of medieval origin, found in many hymnals set to the text "Sing, my tongue, the glorious battle; of the mighty conflict sing...," this text being translated from Venantius Honorius Fortunatus (c540-c600). Found in Hymnorum cum notes, Paris, 1518, one of the earliest known printings.

PASSE-PIED, composed by Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre (1665-1729) for her opera, Cephale et Procris. Visit the composer.

PIZZICATO POLKA, composed by Johann and Josef Strauss in 1869 and regularly performed thereafter on many concert tours. Visit the brothers: Johann and Josef.

POLACCA, composed by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), a movement of his First Brandenburg Concerto. Polacca is Italian for the Polonaise, a dance of Polish origin (not the same as polka, which is of Czech origin). Visit Polonaise and Baroque.

PRESTO (FANTASY 12), composed by Georg Philipp Telemann. This is the sixth aria in Partita 5 in Telemann’s Die Kleine Kammermusik: Sechs Partiten für Violine (Querflöte, Oboe, Blockflöte) und Basso Continuo. See Allegro.

PRESTO (SONATA IN E MINOR), composed by Georg Philipp Telemann. Based on the final movement of Sonata in E Minor, from XII Solos à violon ou traversière, avec la basse chiffrée,, published in Hamburg, 1734. See Allegro.

PRESTO (TOCCATA), composed by Alessandro Scarlatti, adapted from his Toccata per cembalo, published in Howard Ferguson’s compilation, Early Italian Keyboard Music, vol. 2, Oxford University Press, London, 1968. See Minuetto.

PUPPENWIEGENLIED, composed by Robert Schumann, in the third of three sonatas dating from 1853, comprising opus 118. “Puppenwiegenlied” means "doll’s cradle song". See Erster Verlust.

REVEILLE, a bugle call, published as early as 1836 in Brevet Captain S. Cooper's A Concise System of Instructions and Regulations for the Militia and Volunteers of the United States..., Philadelphia. However, James J. Fuld, in his compendium, The Book of World-Famous Music, states that Reveille may have been composed in France in 1831. It appears as Le Réveil in George Kastner's Manuel Général de Musique Militaire á l/Usage des Armées Française, Paris, 1848. Reveille is still sounded in both France and the United States. Visit Reveille.

THE RHINE WALTZ, composed by Johann Strauss, published in Strauss’ Much Admired Waltzes, D. Benteen, Baltimore, before 1850.

RONDEAU, composed by Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de La Guerre for her opera, Cephale et Procris. See Passe-Pied.

RONDO 1, composed by Tielman Susato (c. 1500 – c. 1562), published in his Danserye, 1551. Visit the composer.

RONDO 2, composed by Tielman Susato. See Rondo 1

SANTA LUCIA, published in Echoes of Naples – Thirty Neapolitan Songs, Oliver Ditson Co., Boston, 1909. Visit Santa Lucia, Italy. See Te Voglio Bene Assaje.

SARABANDA, composed by Arcangelo Corelli. This is the third movement of his Sonata VIII. See Allemanda.

THE SEA TEMPEST, composed by Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741). The present arrangement is based on the third and final movement, marked Presto, of the “alternate version” of Vivaldi’s Concerto in F Major for Flute, nicknamed “The Sea Tempest.” See Alla Breve.

SICILIAN FOLK SONG, collected by Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791-1864), published in Fritz Bose’s compilation, Sizilianische Volkslieder, W. de Gruyter, Berlin, 1970.

SNOW-WHITE BIRD, a folk song from Holland – “Daar Was een Sneeuwit Vogeltje.” Published in Michael Raven’s compilation, Folk Songs of the Low Countries…with arrangements for solo guitar, West Central Printing Co., London, 1977. This song and the heritage it represents are mentioned at Folklore of the Low Countries.

TANZ, one of about 108 dance melodies preserved in manuscript form in the Museum Carolinum in Linz, Austria, in a collection entitled Linzer Orgeltabulatur: für Orgel, 1611/1613.

TARDE DE MAYO, a Spanish folksong, in Colecció de Canciones, compiled by María Diez De Oñate of the Conservatorio de Música de Madrid, published by The Vermont Printing Co., Brattleboro, Vermont, 1924.

TE VOGLIO BENE ASSAJE, melody attributed to Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848). The festival of Piedrigotta got started in 1835 and was held more-or-less annually until the 1940's. A song-writing competition was associated with the Festival, and in the first year, the winning song was Te Voglio Bene Assage. This and several other of the best known Neopolitan songs were composed for the competition. Does there exist, somewhere, convincing evidence that the great opera composer Donizetti was truly the composer of the first Neopolitan melody? Visit the attributee.

TRAUER-WALTZ NO. 2, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from his Tänze für Pianoforte. A trauer-waltz is a waltz of mourning or longing. Visit the composer and Naxos.

TRAUER-WALTZER NOS. 16 AND 17, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from his Tänze für Pianoforte. See Trauer-Waltz No. 2.

TRAUER-WALTZER NOS. 19 AND 20, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from his Tänze für Pianoforte. See Trauer-Waltz No. 2.

TRYGGARE KAN INGEN VARA, a Swedish folk song that became hymn tune, as in Hymn 141 in the United Methodist Hymnal, 1989. Visit "Children of the Heavenly Father".

TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR, published as early as 1761 in Let Amusements d’une Heure et Demy, in Paris, and again – this time with words – in Recueil de Romances, Brussels, 1774. The tune is well known with three different sets of lyrics: “Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are!”, “Baa, baa, black sheep, have you any wool? Yes, sir, yes, sir, three bags full,” and “Ist das nicht ein Schnitzelbank? Ja, das ist ein Schnitzelbank.” Visit Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.

TWO ECOSSAISEN, composed by Carl Maria von Weber (1786-1826) for piano, from “Seven Ecossaises,” published together for the first time in Jack Werner’s edition, J. Curwen & Sons, London, 1958. See Ecossaisen Nos. 5 and 6.

UN SOLDADO ME DIÓ UN RAMO, a Spanish folksong, in Colecció de Canciones, compiled by María Diez De Oñate of the Conservatorio de Música de Madrid, published by The Vermont Printing Co., Brattleboro, Vermont, 1924.

UNTER DER LINDEN GRÜNE, a secular song known to Dutch composer Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562-1621), who composed variations on it as found, for example, in his Works for Organ and Keyboard, Dover Publications, New York, 1985.

VENI, VENI, EMMANUEL, well known melody for the Advent hymn, "Oh come, O come, Emmanuel." In modern times, the melody was possibly first published in the music edition of Hymnal Noted, London, 1854. However, in 1966, Mother Thomas Moore announced that the melody occurs in a 15th-century Processional, now preserved in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris.

VILLANCICO, a Spanish folksong, in Colecció de Canciones, compiled by María Diez De Oñate of the Conservatorio de Música de Madrid, published by The Vermont Printing Co., Brattleboro, Vermont, 1924. For details, visit Villancico.

VIVACE (PARTITA IN E MINOR), composed by Georg Philipp Telemann. This is the second aria in Partita 5 in Telemann’s Die Kleine Kammermusik: Sechs Partiten für Violine (Querflöte, Oboe, Blockflöte) und Basso Continuo. See Allegro.

VIVACE (SONATA IN A MINOR), by Jean Baptiste Loeillet (of Ghent, Belgium, 1688 - c.1720).

VIVACE (SONATA IN G), by Jean Baptiste Loeillet (of Ghent, Belgium, 1688 - c.1720).

VIVACE (SONATA IN G MINOR; T), composed by Georg Philipp Telemann. This is the fourth and final movement of the fifth sonata in Telemann’s Douze solos, à violon ou traversière avec la basse chiffrée, published in Hamburg, 1734. See Allegro.

VIVACE (SONATA IN G MINOR; V), composed by Antonio Vivaldi. See Alla Breve.

WER NUR DEN LIEBEN GOTT, composed by Georg Neumark (1621-1681). A well known hymn tune sung to words by the composer. Translated, they begin thus: "If thou but trust in God to guide thee, and hope in him through all thy ways". Visit the composer.

WIENER DAMEN – LÄNDLER NOS. 4 AND 5, composed by Franz Schubert (1791-1828), adapted from his Tänze für Pianoforte. The name "Wiener Damen" means “Ladies of Vienna”. See Ländler.

WOODBIRD, a German folk melody which became a well known hymn tune, now included in many hymnals. The name derives from the first line of the solk song, "Es flog ein klein Waldvöglein," meaning "there flew a litle woodbird." The earliest known appearance of the tune is in an early 17th-century manuscript from Memmingen, Germany.

ZAHZAMIE – Z’VALSE 1-50, total of 80 solos composed for Collection 12 by Clark Kimberling during 2004-2007. A list follows:

Zahzamie, Zallina, Zan Chicka Zan, Zanatanz, Zandalusia, Zantagabriella, Zantahenrietta, Zantajoella, Zantalucy, Zantamichelle, Zantastella, Zareyzi, Zassafeena, Zattatanz, Zavilla, Zavini, Zebbidee, Zeidl, Zelebrité, Zelemann, Zeoni, Zephristi, Zerenade, Zielio, Zifty, Ziprilla, Zmancha, Zopranis, Zopristo, Zumbique, Z'Valse 1, Z'Valse 2, ... , down to Z'Valse 50.



SOURCES FOR NOTES IN COLLECTION 12


James J. Fuld, The Book of World-Famous Music: Classical, Popular and Folk, Third Edition, Dover Publications, New York, 1985.

Raymond F. Glover, The Hymnal 1982 Companion (four volumes), The Church Hymnal Corporation, New York.

Maud Karpeles, Folk Songs of Europe, for the International Folk Music Council, Novello and Company, London, 1956.


INSTRUMENTAL RESOURCES

European Recorder Players Society
European Recorder Teachers Association UK
American Recorder Society
National Flute Association
The Recorder Home Page



ONLINE PERFORMANCES

Mostly from Western Europe. Click and wait a bit. Enjoy, and then return to this list.

Recorder and Piano Victor Borge and Michala Petri, Borge's 80th birthday concert at Tivoli Gardens, Copenhagen, Denmark

Recorder and accordion, David Bellugi & Ivano Battiston in concert, with wonderful European scenery

Bellatrix Recorder Quartet, from Sydney, Australia

Alison Melville, from Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Jill Kemp, from London, England

Giovanni Antonini, Vivaldi Recorder Concerto RV 443, sopranino recorer

Michala Petri, Andante Allegro, from Handel's Concerto in B flat

Bach Brandenburg Concerto 2, 3rd movement

Gianluca Barbaro, Jazz recorder, from Milan, Italy

Laura Cannell, Recorder & violin: traditional, electro-acoutic, baroque, Renaissance, original

António Carrilho, Recorder (Flauta de bisel), from Portugal

Michala Petri, Presto, from Alessando Marcello's Concerto in D minor

László Czidra Recorder performer, conductor, musicologist, from Hungary

Horacio Franco playing Bach Partita No. 3 in E Minor

Michala Petri, when you get there, look around for access to the recordings.

Michala Petri Radio, (various instruments, including recorder)



ACCESS TO THE OTHER COLLECTIONS

Clicking will take you to Historical Notes, and from there you can download solos as PDFs (except for Collection 2, for which all the solos are published commercially).

Historical Notes for Collection 1: African-American and Jamaican Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 2: Christmas Carols; click here for access to the carols.

Historical Notes for Collection 3: Irish Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 4: Americana to 1865

Historical Notes for Collection 5: Americana after 1865

Historical Notes for Collection 6: British Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 7: Melodies by Women

Historical Notes for Collection 8: Eastern European and Jewish Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 9: American Indian Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 10: Latin American Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 11: African Melodies

Historical Notes for Collection 12: Western European Melodies


SOUND RECORDINGS - CLICK AND LISTEN

From Collection 12

Auf Der Alma (Tyrolean, Austria), tenor recorder

The Carnival of Venice (Italy), alto recorder

Giga Manchester (Antonio Vivaldi), tenor recorder

Gavotte in G (Johann Sebastian Bach), tenor recorder

March (Johann Sebastian Bach), soprano recorder

Minuetto in D Minor (Domenico Scarlatti), soprano recorder

La Diane (Francois Couperin), soprano recorder

Le Tambourin (Jean-Philippe Rameau), soprano recorder

Rondo 1 (Tielman Susato), soprano recorder

Snow-White Bird (Netherlands), alto recorder

Z'Valse 40, alto recorder

Zantajoella, alto recorder

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